Marysville to get police station-jail, fire district measures pass, top 2 set for Nov. 6 election

MARYSVILLE – With only a handful of ballots left to be counted countywide after Monday night, Marysville’s sales tax increase has been approved 54 percent to 46 percent.

The measure approved a slight sales tax increase to fund a new police station and jail.

The election will be certified Aug. 21. Turnout in Snohomish County was 37 percent.

The sales tax increase hikes the rate within the city limits to 9.2 percent, still lower than other Snohomish County municipalities. The increase is 10 cents on every $100 spent in the city. It does not include groceries, prescription drugs or automobile purchases.

The tax will go to pay for a new $23 million police station and jail. The old station and jail were built in 1986 and are overcrowded with officers and inmates.

During that time, the number of officers has gone from 24 to 100.

The city now plans to sell its buildings and properties and build a new civic campus for $20 million that will house most city departments.

Meanwhile, in Fire District 21, the measure also passed 52 percent to 48 percent.

It’s the first time fire officials tried to pass a levy increase since 1960. The rate will go from 50 cents to $1.30 per $1,000 valuation. The owner of a $350,000 home would pay $280 more per year, for a total of $455 annually.

The money will be used to build a new fire station in McElroy to cut response times in as much as half. It also would remodel Arlington Heights Station 49 so that both would contain living quarters with round-the-clock staffing.

For Fire District 19 in Silvana, voters also approved raising the EMS levy from 43 to the maximum 50 cents per $1,000 valuation. The vote was 60 percent to 40 percent.

Federal, state and SnoCo races

In the federal, state and county races, the top two move on to the November general election.

Rep. Mike Sells in the 38th district and prosecutor Adam Cornell were unopposed.

In the 39th District, Republican incumbent Elizabeth Scott did not even make the top two.

The leaders Monday night were:

U.S. Senator

Maria Cantwell D – 55 percent

Susan Hutchison R – 24 percent

U.S. Rep. 1

Suzan DelBene D – 59 percent

Jeffrey Beeler R – 26 percent

U.S. Rep. 2

Rick Larsen D – 65 percent

Brian Luke L – 8 percent

State Senator 38

John McCoy D – 40 percent

Savio Pham R – 31 percent

State Rep. 38 (1)

June Robinson D – 67 percent

Bert Johnson I – 33 percent

State Sen. 39

Claus Joens D – 39 percent

Keith Wagoner R – 30 percent

State Rep. 39 (1)

Ivan Lewis D – 46 percent

Robert Sutherland R – 40 percent

State Rep. 39 (2)

Carolyn Eslick R – 55 percent

Eric Halvorson D – 45 percent

State Sen. 44

Steve Hobbs D – 55 percent

Doug Roulstone R – 41 percent

State Rep. 44 (1)

John Lovick D – 57 percent

Jeff Sax R – 43 percent

State Rep. 44 (2)

Jared Mead D – 53 percent

Mark Harmsworth R – 47 percent

SnoCo PUD 1 (1)

Sid Logan – 32 percent

Mary Rollins – 30 percent

SnoCo PUD 1 (2)

Rebecca Wolfe – 31 percent

David Chan – 28 percent

Marysville 12 precinct officer

Sandra Billmyer 91

Rodolfo Corona 36

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