10 years ago — 1998

• The union employees of the city of Marysville overwhelmingly rejected the latest contract offer from the city. The vote comes after nine months of negotiations and a meeting last week in which union negotiators reportedly would recommend to members that they approve the offer. City Administrator Dave Zabell spoke for the city’s negotiating team when he said, “We are extremely disappointed.” The rejection means city workers will enter their seventh month working without a contract. The rejected contract would have reportedly given workers a pay increase of more than 20 percent spread over four years. Employees voted 65-9 against the proposal. Public Works Shop Steward Doug Boyle, who is part of the employees’ negotiating team, said workers spoke against the four-year deal; they were hoping for a 20 percent raise over three years. He said he didn’t speak against the contract offer but that many in the audience did: “People were a bit upset.”

  • Wednesday, July 2, 2008 12:00am
  • News

• The union employees of the city of Marysville overwhelmingly rejected the latest contract offer from the city. The vote comes after nine months of negotiations and a meeting last week in which union negotiators reportedly would recommend to members that they approve the offer. City Administrator Dave Zabell spoke for the city’s negotiating team when he said, “We are extremely disappointed.” The rejection means city workers will enter their seventh month working without a contract. The rejected contract would have reportedly given workers a pay increase of more than 20 percent spread over four years. Employees voted 65-9 against the proposal. Public Works Shop Steward Doug Boyle, who is part of the employees’ negotiating team, said workers spoke against the four-year deal; they were hoping for a 20 percent raise over three years. He said he didn’t speak against the contract offer but that many in the audience did: “People were a bit upset.”

25 years ago — 1983

• Hopes are always high at this time of the year as Marysville’s Strawberry Little League baseball and softball program goes out in search of district honors. “We got ’em all, now,” cheered Burger Stop head coach Lloyd Seibert after his Burgermen scored a 5-3 victory over host South Everett Sunday to win the Major Little League district crown, the second in four years for Seibert and his boys. It was one down and two to go after Marysville Senior League softball claimed the district title with an 8-1 win over Lakewood’s Sunset Body Works last Thursday at Snohomish. Marysville Major League softball champions Rodger’s Electric delayed their victory party one day when they dropped a 12-10 decision to host Snohomish that same Thursday. But they came back the next day to make it two out of two for the Marysville program when they edged Snohomish 5-4, leading up to Burger Stop’s hardball triumph.

50 years ago — 1958

• Following the running of the Ebey Slough Races, several Marysville businessmen were called together to consider the possibility of a community-sponsored hydroplane. Howard Gilliam, owner of “Rocky,” offered his Ted Jones-designed speedster and Norm Evans offered his 280 Corvette engine as well as his driving services to the town. The town of Marysville was to supply $500 for necessary expenses for seven races including the national championships. Brown Goodrich accepted the responsibility of heading the fund raising campaign and The Globe agreed to publicize the efforts. The campaign was to start immediately and over $200 was pledged within 24 hours.

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