We need more input if you want our extensive sports coverage to continue

  • Saturday, January 5, 2019 1:30am
  • Opinion

By Steve Powell

We have received less than 10 responses regarding if The Marysville Globe-The Arlington Times covers too much in the way of high school sports.

Most favor the coverage, but we expected supporters to respond more. But along with our general readership, we’d also like to hear from athletic directors, coaches, players, families, friends, etc. Do you appreciate what we provide? Or should we use that space and time to cover other stories in the community? Do people still like to see pictures in the paper and stories about the prep sports teams? Our competitors do not do that. We feel we provide a service they don’t. But is that something communities no longer care about?

There was a time not long ago when people loved to see photos and names in the paper. They would cut them out, put them in scrapbooks or on the refrigerator, share them with families and friends. We even go further than that. We provide slide shows online so people can share photos around the world if they like. It’s not just a few. We try to put photos of many different players online.

But we have faced cutbacks and providing that coverage could be hurting other coverage that readers would like to see more of. It’s tough to make a decision if we don’t hear from you what you want. We’d also like to know what other stories people want to read about. We don’t run as much in the way of crime as many other papers. Is that something you want more of? Please email me your thoughts to spowell@marysvilleglobe.com.

On another topic are we really becoming so sensitive we can’t have signs that read “Dead End street?”

True, the term dead end constitutes negativity. But the sign just means it’s the end of the road. It’s not making a judgment on anyone who lives there. Do people living on dead end streets really feel that is saying something about their personalities?

I’m offended. I’m more disturbed by the sign “No outlets.” That makes me feel like I’m trapped or that houses on that street have no electrical outlets. I’m kidding of course, but I hope you get the drift. Anything can be offensive to anyone nowadays, and it’s gone too far.

If you’re offended so be it. It’s not government’s job to keep people from being offended. In fact, it’s government’s job, through school, to teach people not to be offended – but to teach them to be tolerant of different points of views.

Steve Powell is managing editor of The Marysville Globe-The Arlington Times.

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