We all should use our voices in Olympia

  • Saturday, January 13, 2018 1:30am
  • Opinion

With a short state legislative session under way, it’s important for the city to continue its partnerships with our elected leaders in Olympia and to clearly articulate the value of proposed state investments.

Competition is strong. The City Council and I have identified these priorities

•Railroad Overcrossings: Because it can take years to procure funding, the city first seeks design funds so we can demonstrate the kind of early progress that makes it easier to earn future construction funds. The city proposes to build an overcrossing on Grove Street from State Avenue to Cedar Avenue over the BNSF railroad tracks to increase east-west connectivity. A 2015 study found this the most suitable overcrossing location as it would not take away access to State Avenue or local business entrances, and would require minimal property acquisition. Total cost is $24 million. The city seeks $1 million in state funding for design and will provide $1 million in matching funds.

•The city also wants to build a railroad overcrossing on 156th Street NE west of I-5. Together with the future I-5 interchange at 156th, this would provide efficient traffic flow for people traveling west of the freeway to housing and commercial developments. The city seeks $1 million in state funding for design. •The new Highway 529 interchange is fully funded with construction slated to begin in 2019. That will provide the first grade-separated alternative for Marysville travelers to avoid train traffic. Adding new overcrossings at Grove Street and 156th Street would bring real relief with train-free options in north, central and south Marysville.

•Arlington-Marysville Manufacturing Industrial Center: The city, together with Arlington, seeks official designation by the Puget Sound Regional Council of the MIC as a recognized Regional Manufacturing Industrial Center.

•Ebey Waterfront Trail and Shoreline Access Project: The city now seeks $500,000 to fund design of expanded park property along the waterfront and the remaining segment of the Ebey Waterfront Trail.

These are the kinds of recreational, cultural and economic investments that truly make a difference in the quality of life for Marysville residents and visitors. I urge you to contact your elected representatives to offer support for these city projects.

Jon Nehring is the mayor of Marysville. His column runs each month.

More in Opinion

Manufacturing jobs center gets green light

Even before I became mayor 11 years ago, city leaders and staff… Continue reading

Hits and misses

Hits To all the local leaders who worked so hard to get… Continue reading

It will again feel like the 4th of July in Marysville

We weren’t happy with the city when Marysville banned fireworks a few… Continue reading

Don’t forget to water yourself in summer

Summer is here, and that can mean a lot more drinking -… Continue reading

Real estate moves faster in summer

Call me childish but beating the GPS time is an extreme sport… Continue reading

Emily Countryman
Want to soak up the sun? Do it safely

Are you ready to soak up the sun? Most of us in… Continue reading

Loomis
How can anyone be against having clean water?

I don’t know how you can be against clean water, but some… Continue reading

Our cities offer free entertainment

We are very fortunate to live in Marysville and Arlington. Both communities… Continue reading

5 real estate tips to avoid stress

Stressed is desserts spelled backwards. So let’s start the meal with pie… Continue reading

We’re proud of our students, staff at MSD

Great things are happening in the Marysville School District. If you’ve read… Continue reading

In 1 year, embedded social worker program making a difference

Police Chief Rick Smith and I joined officials Tuesday from Snohomish County… Continue reading