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Carlile sworn in as Marysville's newest police officer

From left, Marysville Police Officer Derek Carlile recites the oath with Mayor Dennis Kendall, while Police Chief Rick Smith looks on, at the Sept. 28 City Council meeting. - Kirk Boxleitner
From left, Marysville Police Officer Derek Carlile recites the oath with Mayor Dennis Kendall, while Police Chief Rick Smith looks on, at the Sept. 28 City Council meeting.
— image credit: Kirk Boxleitner

MARYSVILLE — Marysville's newest police officer was sworn in at the Sept. 28 City Council meeting, as Entry Level Officer Derek Carlile recited the oath with Mayor Dennis Kendall.

Marysville Police Cmdr. Robb Lamoureux introduced Carlile to the meeting's attendees as "a local boy" from the Bothell area. Carlile comes from a family of four brothers and two sisters, and graduated from Bothell High School in 1999.

Carlile volunteered to serve as a missionary for his church by moving to Independence, Mo., for two years starting in 2000, after which he attended "several colleges," according to Lamoureux, before receiving his degree in business administration from Central Washington University in 2006.

Carlile worked in sales before being employed by the city of Marysville, including 18 months of selling dispatch furniture. When he graduated third in his class from the Washington State Basic Law Enforcement Academy and Criminal Justice Center Sept. 10, he was voted the officer that his classmates would most like to have as their backup at work.

Carlile and his wife of six years, Forrest, live in South Everett with their three children — Jenna, Elle and Steele.

Marysville Police Chief Rick Smith praised Carlile for working his way through college while married, and for working with underprivileged children in Missouri. Smith explained that Carlile was originally hired as a non-commissioned police officer candidate, before completing more than 720 hours of training at the academy.

"He's a good guy with great common sense, but our expectations are high," Smith said. "We expect new officers to learn, grow and mature. We throw a lot at them, and expect them to act appropriately and work independently."

Smith cited Carlile's "service mentality" and desire to help others as assets. Carlile's probationary period as a police officer lasts until one year after the date of his graduation from the academy.

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