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Mville schools to increase lunch prices

Keeping up with the Jones will push the cost of student meals up by 25 cents this fall as the Marysville School District raised prices to meet increased labor and food costs, spurred by higher fuel prices. We found that we were about a year behind, finance director Jim Baker said. -
Keeping up with the Jones will push the cost of student meals up by 25 cents this fall as the Marysville School District raised prices to meet increased labor and food costs, spurred by higher fuel prices. We found that we were about a year behind, finance director Jim Baker said.
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MARYSVILLE The Marysville School District is reluctantly raising lunch prices for the upcoming school year, citing a hit on food prices by higher fuel costs.
Lunch and breakfasts at the schools will increase by 25 cents, and will still be in the middle of the pack when viewed against other local school districts. They will be about a dime more expensive than the state average, however.
The change is included in the districts $105 million general fund budget.
According to finance director Jim Baker the food service program is supposed to break even for the district, although food service contractor Chartwells will make a stipulated profit on the one million lunches served to the districts 11,500 students. The district reviews its prices on an annual basis to see how it stacks up with neighboring districts.
We found that we were about a year behind, Baker said. So its really catching up. The reality is that food and labor costs forced our hand.
He said Chartwells cited higher fuel costs as one of the main culprits driving up material costs in their $3.2 million business with the district. Baker said the district was happy to be in last place and only reluctantly made the increase.
In addition to the million lunches served, Marysville students scarfed down an additional 300,000 breakfasts, as well. Thats the growth industry the district is trying to increase, Baker said.
We want to push that and increase that each year, Baker said. Were pretty happy about that.
The Arlington School District raised its prices by a quarter last year but doesnt foresee an further increases, according to spokeswoman Misti Gilman.

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