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Jubie yard sale raises money for food bank

Pictured at the fifth annual Gail Jubie Memorial Yard Sales final day on Sept. 30 are, from left, back row: Phil, Doug and Marie Jubie.  In the front row from left are Bobby Kossak, Laura Bailey, Marge Martin, Rich Jubie, Maria Jubie and Brian Jubie.  In the five years of the sale existence the family has raised close to $100,000 for the Marysville Community Food Bank. -
Pictured at the fifth annual Gail Jubie Memorial Yard Sales final day on Sept. 30 are, from left, back row: Phil, Doug and Marie Jubie. In the front row from left are Bobby Kossak, Laura Bailey, Marge Martin, Rich Jubie, Maria Jubie and Brian Jubie. In the five years of the sale existence the family has raised close to $100,000 for the Marysville Community Food Bank.
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MARYSVILLE The fifth annual Gail Jubie Memorial Yard sale was a roaring success with visitors clogging site during the three days of sales last weekend, organizers said.
Since their beloved sister Gail was murdered in 2000 the Jubie family of Marysville has marshaled its efforts to raise close to $100,000 in contributions to the Marysville Community Food Bank, a favorite charity of their late sibling.
The community has responded with a huge turnout for yet another year with a hungry mob waiting to pour over the donated goods during the Sept. 28 opening. Not only do shoppers support the sale with purchases but all of the wares are donated by people from around the area.
This year people are being more generous with their donations, said Marge Martin, Gails sister. Weve got a lot of new stuff donated.
In addition to friends and family who gave things to and volunteered for the sale, she thanked the many commercial sponsors for contributions of time, equipment of cash. They included Roy Robinson Chevrolet, Saturn of Lynnwood, title-sponsor HomeStreet Bank and the Marysville Noon Rotary. Others pitching in were Bickford Motors, and State Farm insurance agent Steve Fulton, said Phil Jubie.
Weve got a lot of cash commitments that people have made, Martin said during the final day of sales on Sept. 30 as vultures were scouring the marked-down offerings. Thursday we had at least 30 people in line for at least four hours.
The informal goal is to reach $25,000, which would put the sales gross receipts for five years in the six-figure bracket. Other groups are conducting fundraisers for the sale and it will be some time until the proceeds from those off-site events will be known.
Were still adding up checks, but it looks like were going to be close, said family member Laura Bailey.
Cec Stenning was a volunteer trying to find a place or a buyer for a green felt-covered ironing board when she ran into Char Cross, another worker. Stenning said she has been volunteering at the sale for all five years.
I used to teach some of these Jubies, Stenning said, referring to her days in the Lake Stevens schools. Its quite fun.
For Martin words like that are turning straw into gold, as the point of the sale was to help the food bank, a favorite charity for Gail, a major-league shopper who always bought extra to give away. Gail was her biking buddy and after she was killed it gave Martins family little satisfaction to see her killer put away. The sale is a positive side, as cousins have turned out to help year after year, as have complete strangers, such as the family of murdered teenager Rachel Burkheimer.
Its brought us a lot closer, Martin said. Most of the family turns out to help.

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