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Girls Scouts aid Quil Ceda with annual planting and renovation

Kari Barile and her mother Tricia, work together at Meadowcreek Park near Shoultes Elementary School during the Save Our Sound event  This was the 12th year the Girl Scouts have worked on local waterways. -
Kari Barile and her mother Tricia, work together at Meadowcreek Park near Shoultes Elementary School during the Save Our Sound event This was the 12th year the Girl Scouts have worked on local waterways.
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MARYSVILLE For the 12th year in a row a group of local Girl Scouts pitched in to help restore and improve salmon habitat in local waterways.
Members of Troop 50401 are working toward earning their Bronze Medals, the highest award possible at the junior level and they used a bright morning last Saturday to plant beneficial trees and shrubs on the banks of Quilceda Creek near Shoultes Elementary School.
The Oct. 27 exercise was a combination of lessons and practice, as about 60 girls revisited the site at the center of the Meadow Green housing development where the creek flows. Last year the troop planted thousands of saplings in the four-acre Meadowcreek Park. Last weekends outing improved the riparian zone around the creek, as the scouts replanted some of those trees and added many new ones. The event was formerly known as Save Our Waves but has changed to Save Our Sound to reflect the larger impact the work has on local water quality. Guidance is provided locally by the Snohomish County Surface Water Management program.
Last year the troops did a lot of heavy lifting, digging out plants that dont contribute to healthy water or fish, so this year the pre-teens spent more of their time putting plants into the ground than they did yanking them out.
Seven-year-old Kari Barile of Marysville was working with her mother Tricia to create a new place for an evergreen sapling on the slope near the creek. They used shovels to dig a hole in the soil before tipping the plant out of its container and then plopping it in the hole.
Its important to give the trees somewhere to grow, Barile explained.
Her mom told her how the trees create shade that helps keep the water cool for the fish that live in the creek.
Lakewoods Samantha Staab is a fifth-grader at Cougar Creek Elementary School and she was close to the water with her shovel, helping Isabelle Romero with anther juvenile plant in need of a home. She shared the following equation: trees = bugs = salmon. It goes like this: Salmon eat bugs and bugs like plants, Staab explained. They provide bugs shelter and better habitat.
Her mother Angela said the Girl Scouts learned to take responsibility for their planet and to do their part to make it better.
In past years the organization has helped restore and study other local waterways, including Grace Creek on Getchell Hill.

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