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Fun with a message, Summer Jubilee draws thousands to Asbery Field

Her smile might not be evident here, but Freyga Makee, 11, left, did in fact grin at least a little as she received a free back-to-school hair cut from cosmetology student Alyssa Messenger. Free haircuts and school supplies were two of the main attractions for the annual Summer Jubilee. -
Her smile might not be evident here, but Freyga Makee, 11, left, did in fact grin at least a little as she received a free back-to-school hair cut from cosmetology student Alyssa Messenger. Free haircuts and school supplies were two of the main attractions for the annual Summer Jubilee.
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MARYSVILLE "It's just something we can do to give back to the city of Marysville," said Steve Ross, a physician who volunteered to help staff the emergency medical tent during the 2008 Summer Jubilee at Asbery Field, Aug. 10.

"It's a blessing," he added, also stating, he had not been called on to deal with any major accidents.

A newly ordained deacon for Mountain View Presbyterian Church, Sharon Jacobs said she never knew Marysville had an event like Summer Jubilee.

"I had no idea this went on," she said, pointing around to the thousands who milled about the field. "I think it's just absolutely wonderful."

"The whole thing, it's just good, it's fun," said George Perkins, who brought his son and daughter, ages 3 and 7 respectively, to the Jubilee. "And it's about Christ. That's why we're here."

Now boasting dozens of sponsors and organized by 14 local churches, Summer Jubilee started out as a fairly simple project undertaken by Marysville's Turning Point Church. For the first Jubilee, the congregation got together and gave out about 50 bags of free school supplies and held a potluck dinner for church members.

Prior to this year's Jubilee, event coordinator Judi Johnston said volunteers handed out 5,500 bags of school stuffs in 2007. On the day of the event, volunteers said they expected the 2008 Jubilee at least to match that number.

For this year, free items included everything from crayons to glue sticks to notebooks for elementary kids. Older kids received slightly different items. The school supply tent had a long line, with dozens of volunteers working inside to stuff bags and hand out items.

"It's all very much appreciated," said mom Christian Grove, who showed up with her three elementary aged children. "I get to save some money and they get to have some fun."

The fun was to be had on any of a dozen or so inflatable, carnival-type attractions. They included jousting matches with big inflatable bats to slides and obstacle courses.

In addition to school supplies, students up to high school age could receive free back-to-school haircuts, an offering that also attracted a big crowd.

Visiting the Jubilee with mom Anna Makee, Freyga Makee, 11, wanted more of a trim than a haircut. She also wasn't sure if she is happy or annoyed with the fact she'll soon be back in a local classroom.

"Both," Freyga said.

For adults and older kids, there was plenty of entertainment on the Jubilee main stage. Around noon, artist David Garibaldi splashed paint on a canvas to the rhythm of an old classic rock song and shortly had created a painting of a Hispanic man. Like other performers and events at Jubilee, Garibaldi sprinkled a Christian message into his performance, talking about how God inspired him to give up graffiti.

God and getting tired of running from police, he said.

"Everybody just comes together," Johnston added, referring to not only the cooperation between the 14 organizing churches, but also the sponsorships from local businesses to the city police helping coach organizers on security for the event.

"It's just such a fun time," Johnston concluded.

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