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TBD Board evaluates project priorities

City of Marysville Transportation Benefit District Board Chair Jeff Vaughan and Board member Donna Wright review the potential projects to be funded by an 0.02 percent sales tax increase on the April 22 special election ballot. - Kirk Boxleitner
City of Marysville Transportation Benefit District Board Chair Jeff Vaughan and Board member Donna Wright review the potential projects to be funded by an 0.02 percent sales tax increase on the April 22 special election ballot.
— image credit: Kirk Boxleitner

MARYSVILLE — The city of Marysville’s Transportation Benefit District Board met on Monday, March 17, to seek further clarification of the potential projects to be funded by an 0.02 percent sales tax increase on the April 22 special election ballot.

City of Marysville Public Works Director Kevin Nielsen presented a revised 10-year plan for $13.5 million in pavement preservation and $2.5 million in shoulder and sidewalk capital improvement transportation projects. The shoulder and sidewalk improvements would be paid for in equal installments of $250,000 per year and the pavement preservation would likewise be paid for in equal installments of $1.35 million each year.

The pavement preservation dollars would be further divided among three geographic zones in Marysville, with each one receiving a total of $4.5 million each. The north zone would be north of 100th Street NE, the central zone would be south of 100th Street NE and north of Grove Street, and the south zone would be south of Grove Street.

“We’d be focusing more on maintaining arterials and collectors, because they cost so much to reconstruct that you get the biggest bang for your buck there,” Nielsen said. “It’s like owning a house. If you don’t paint the outside, the siding goes bad. The roads are a wearing surface. We’re trying to keep water and other elements from penetrating that surface, and doing damage to the sub-base.”

Rob Toyer voiced a refrain that was common among his fellow TBD Board members, when he asserted the importance of letting the city’s citizens know where their tax dollars would be going, in as much specific detail as possible. Marysville City Attorney Grant Weed touted the “Marysville University” on Wednesday, March 26, as an opportunity to provide citizens with that level of specificity, but warned that any promises made would then represent the minimum of what taxpayers would expect.

“Once that list goes out officially, the city has to be committed to it,” Weed said.

Board Vice Chair Steve Muller reiterated the frequently cited statistic that, if approved, the April 22 ballot measure would result in an increased tax of only 20 cents per every $100 of taxable goods purchased in the city of Marysville.

“That’s a great value to the community,” Muller said.

“It actually saves the city money, because we’ll be paying more for these repairs in the long run,” agreed fellow Board member Kamille Norton.

Marysville University’s free spring quarter class will not only review the important road projects set for this year, but also conduct an interactive poll on how attendees would prioritize roadway preservation projects. The civics learning class is scheduled to run from 6:30-8:30 p.m. on March 26, in the Marysville City Council Chambers, on the second floor of Marysville City Hall, located at 1049 State Ave. Featured speakers are set to include not only Nielsen, but also Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring and Assistant City Engineer John Cowling.

 

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