Lifestyle

Boy Scout bringing flying disc golf to Marysville

Christian Hauer shows off an example of one of the sponsorship signs through which he hopes to raise the remaining funds for a flying disc golf course near the Strawberry Fields for Rover off-leash dog park. - Kirk Boxleitner
Christian Hauer shows off an example of one of the sponsorship signs through which he hopes to raise the remaining funds for a flying disc golf course near the Strawberry Fields for Rover off-leash dog park.
— image credit: Kirk Boxleitner

MARYSVILLE — For his Eagle Scout project, 13-year-old Christian Hauer wants to bring a new type of sport to the fields of Marysville.

Hauer enjoys playing flying disc golf, a Frisbee game with large above-ground baskets to catch the discs instead of tee holes for golf balls, so to earn his community merit badge, he's been working with city of Marysville officials to set up a nine-basket course near the Strawberry Fields for Rover off-leash dog park.

Hauer first contacted city of Marysville Parks and Recreation Director Jim Ballew about his idea, and made the case that this sport serves all ages and skill levels, thereby aligning it with the mission statement of the Marysville Healthy Communities Project. When asked how he planned to make this dream a reality, Hauer explained that he'd been in contact with professionally qualified disc golf course designer Lowell Shields and Disc Golf Association General Manager Scott Keasey about ordering the baskets and the layout of the course.

Hauer credited city of Marysville Parks and Recreations Manager Mike Robinson with taking part in the design work of the course's layout. To help fund the course, Hauer and the Marysville Rotary have discussed having businesses sponsor prominent signage at each basket for $600, similar to the tee hole sponsorships by local businesses at regular golf courses.

Hauer has estimated that nine disc baskets would run $3,023, while the concrete to mount them would cost $27. He further assessed the cost of mulch for the project at $36, 10 yards of gravel plus delivery expenses at $390, treated wood at $267, a 300-pack of 1.5-inch screws at $27, and steel stakes at $99.

After the Parks Advisory Board gave their unanimous approval Jan. 6, Hauer presented his proposal to the Marysville City Council March 8. Carmen Rasmussen, Council liaison to the Parks Advisory Board, expressed her enthusiasm for the project, as did Jeff Vaughan, the son of an Eagle Scout and a former Eagle Scout himself. Vaughan praised Hauer for proposing a new form of recreation and mapping out his plans with qualified professionals in the disc golf field.

With Hauer's family members, friends and fellow Scouts volunteering their aid for the installation work, Hauer expects the disc golf course could be complete as early as the middle of June, and plans to demonstrate disc golf at the June 5 Healthy Communities Challenge Day.

"This is a great use of existing Marysville land, that's currently seeing little to no use, that could benefit a community that needs to get out and play," Hauer said.

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