Lifestyle

Treasure Trove Antique Appraisal debuts at KBCC

Don Jensen, featured on PBS’s Antiques Roadshow for seven seasons, shares some of the history of the items that are brought to him during the Treasure Trove Antique Appraisal Show at the Ken Baxter Community Center on March 8. - Kirk Boxleitner
Don Jensen, featured on PBS’s Antiques Roadshow for seven seasons, shares some of the history of the items that are brought to him during the Treasure Trove Antique Appraisal Show at the Ken Baxter Community Center on March 8.
— image credit: Kirk Boxleitner

MARYSVILLE — The Treasure Trove Antique Appraisal Show made a successful debut at the Ken Baxter Community Center on Saturday, March 8, according to city of Marysville Recreation Coordinator Maryke Burgess.

Sponsored by The Cottages at Marysville, this event afforded attendees a unique opportunity to have items ranging from jewelry to furniture examined by a trio of professional appraisers who offered verbal histories and market value assessments of each item.

“Everyone was happy to learn more about their treasures,” Burgess said. “Some people were excited to learn the value of their items, while others thought it was great to learn more history about certain pieces. While our antique enthusiasts were waiting their turn, I noticed a lot of conversation and sharing of stories among the participants. As they got closer to their turn, the ones right behind them were eager to listen in on those appraisals.”

Burgess touted the extensive expertise of the event’s three appraisers:  Bette Bell, who specializes in textiles, quilts and Asian goods; Kathleen Victor, who’s more studied in jewelry, toys, ads and artwork; and Don Jensen, featured on PBS’s Antiques Roadshow for seven seasons, who brought with him a wealth of knowledge on silver, furniture and fine art.

“People brought in their pottery, silver, furniture and jewelry,” Burgess said. “One person hefted in an end table that was worth more than $1,000, while another had a Native American purse that wasn’t worth as much as she’d thought, but she was still fascinated by what Don had to say about its history, which she looked forward to telling others. Two ladies were just smiling from ear to ear on their way out, because they couldn’t wait to go through their houses, to bring things back for the next time.”

Mike and Cheryl Berry were one couple who spoke with Jensen, and they were surprised to learn that the Chinese vase that Mike had inherited — from his grandfather’s stepfather, Frank Meachum — could be worth between $800 to $1,000.

“This was Don’s conservative estimate, until we can get the words on the vase deciphered,” Mike Berry said. “I had no idea, and it was such a treat to hear that from someone who’s so well known in that field. We’d like to do this again in about six months or so.”

The Berrys were among those who bolstered the event’s turnout, which filled up its pre-appointment list a week in advance, even as event organizers still sought to accommodate drop-in participants during the day itself.

“It was nice that the drop-in participants didn’t have to wait too long before seeing the appraisers,” Burgess said. “On average, the appraisers spent about five minutes per item, looking them over.”

In response to the Berrys, and a number of other attendees who inquired as to when this event might return, Burgess would love to make the Treasure Trove Antique Appraisal Show an annual feature each March at the Ken Baxter Community Center.

“The jewelry that people brought in was so ornate and interesting, but the most notable moment of the day for me was just seeing the sheer delight on people’s faces,” Burgess said.

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

Read the latest Green Edition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Aug 23 edition online now. Browse the archives.