Museum turns 1, exhibits much older than that

MARYSVILLE – The first year of the Marysville Museum is history.

Well almost. On June 3, from noon to 3 p.m., the museum will celebrate its one-year anniversary with a free celebration featuring refreshments, games for kids and guest speakers.

And, just in time for Memorial Day weekend, the museum includes some new displays, including one honoring the military.

Historical society president Ken Cage said Tuesday that display honors the “season coming up: Memorial Day, Flag Day, the Fourth of July…”

The display includes “Survival Crackers” that were found in the old Marysville High School. They were down in a bunker placed there to keep staff and students safe in case of war.

Problem is, “Nobody knew it was there,” Cage said.

That display takes the place of one that featured music. The museum likes to change exhibits so there is something new every time someone visits.

Another new display can be seen at the end of the hall as soon as visitors enter the building at 6805 Armar Road.

It’s called, “Marysville – From Forest to Front Street.” It shows pictures of John Comeford, the founder of Marysville, his wife, Maria, and other early inhabiters of the city, including their family members. The pictures hang over a backdrop of trees drawn by Comeford’s son. The display was paid for by donations from two of Comeford’s granddaughters. “They wanted something to honor their parents,” Cage said.

The exhibit also has a speaker with buttons on it. Visitors can push a button and listen to a story about that pioneer.

Also on that wall is a hand-written ballot from Marysville’s first election – which determined that it would incorporate as a city rather than stay a town. The ballot was found in a grandson’s dresser drawer, Cage said.

Lastly, the wall includes the story about the attempt to name our fair city Mariasville, after Comeford’s wife. But since a town in the region in Idaho already was named that, the post office required a new name – so Marysville it was.

In its first year, the museum has been home to Marysville Rotary and historical society meetings. Local schools have taken many field trips to the site, although Cage said he would love to see more. The Marysville City Band has had a concert there, and plans to have another June 8. And visitors also are able to buy some historical items at the museum now, including albums such as Tom Jones, antique phones and sea-themed table centerpieces.

“We’ve got more stuff than we can display,” Cage said of why some items are being sold.

Cage said the museum has turned into even more than what he had ever dreamed of. “I love this place,” he said.

He said he wished that some of those who started the effort with him so many years ago were still around to see it.

“I hope they are looking down and saying, ‘Yea, we did it.’”

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