Marysville students learn about many opportunities for futures

EVERETT – Just like in the old board game Monopoly, when Opportunity Knocks it is good to be prepared for anything that could happen.

High school students from Marysville found that out Tuesday at the fifth annual Opportunity EXPO at Everett Community College.

Marysville Getchell and Marysville-Pilchuck students found out about all kinds of jobs they didn’t know about before at the event. Vendors were on hand from various businesses, agencies, military branches and colleges.

Tom Albright, a school board member, was there representing the Marysville-area pastor police and fire chaplain program. “I want to give them a wider view of what might be out there” for a career, Albright said. “You don’t have to make a million dollars” to be happy.

He said jobs in social services are very rewarding because you can help others. Albright said the event is as valuable for the vendors as for the kids because they get to see just how prepared and intelligent the students are.

Connie Mennie and Leah Tocco were there representing the city of Marysville. They said the city has all types of job openings, and that not all require a four-year college degree. “We’re here to discuss different career paths youth may not be aware of,” Tocco said.

Mennie added that the city has openings for youth, especially in parks, for the summer. Kerrie Ervin and Alisha Miller represented EvCC’s cosmetology program. They said about 50 students attend the school, which actually is near the Goodwill in Marysville. Participants can finish school in about six quarters. Students that take it in high school through Running Start can find jobs right after graduation.

“It’s not hard to find a job,” Ervin said. Miller added, “It depends where you work how much you can make.”

Marysville dentist Kelly Peterson was there to talk about his profession. He said it takes about eight years to become a dentist, four to be a dental hygienest, and a year or more to be a dental assistant. The latter job skills can be learned at a vocational school.

Peterson said he only has a staff of eight, so he was doing it just as much to try to get students interested in the profession.

“Give them an idea of what opportunities they have – to peak their interest in dentistry,” he said.

Along with visiting different booths with various employers, students also were able to take tours of the EvCC campus and the popular new Advanced Manufacturing and Training Education Center.

At each stop on the AMTEC tour, guides talked about hands-on learning, the need for trained workers, and that they are good-paying jobs.

•Welding: There are two- and one-year programs at EvCC. Welding is done on cars, ships, pipelines and more.

•Mechatronics: It is a two-year program where students learn robotics, hydraulics and electronics. •Computer-assisted drafting: An idea is drawn, drafted, designed and created on a three-dimensional printer.

•Composites: It’s when two materials are combined to make a stronger substance, such as rubber, plywood, fiberglass, etc. Students make everything from skateboards to drones. Jobs are in aerospace and auto-body work.

•Machining: Learn to use computer-controlled machines to make products for companies such as Boeing.