Arts and Entertainment

Public meetings on stream surveys

 - File photo
— image credit: File photo

The Adopt-A-Stream Foundation has announced four different meetings for landowners along four different Snohomish County streams to explore ways to improve salmon habitat and water quality.

One of four public meetings is about Quilceda Creek, that passes from the south edge of Arlington through the heart of Marysville. The Quilceda Creek meeting starts at 7 p.m., Wednesday, April 23 at the Marysville Fire District Training Room, 1635 Grove Street, in Marysville.

The meetings will introduce stream surveys available from the Department of Ecology to landowners along Quilceda Creek as well as Swamp Creek, North Creek and Little Bear Creek. Land-owners will be asked to complete the surveys providing information to the AASF will prepare an enhancement plan and work in partnership with landowners to find resources to correct any issues.

Anyone interested in participating in these stream surveys should call 425-316-8592 or attend one of the scheduled public meetings listed below:

n For Quilceda Creek, 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 23 at the Marysville Fire District Training Room, 1635 Grove Street, in Marysville.

n For Swamp Creek: 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 15 at Northshore Utility District, Tolt Room, 6830 NE 185th Street, Kenmore.

n For Little Bear Creek: 7 p.m. Thursday, April 17 at Carol Edwards Center, Evergreen Room, 17401 133rd Avenue NE, Woodinville

n For North Creek, 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 22 at the Northwest Stream Center in McCollum Park, 600 128th Street SE, Everett.

Other fun events

Other Adopt-a-Stream events coming up include the Company of Crows & Ravens, when John Marzluff will speak about the uneasy relationship between humans and the genus Corvus, which includes both crows and ravens.

Humanity's fear/respect relationship with these birds goes back millions of years, according to Marzluff, professor of wildlife science at the University of Washington. His recent book, "In the Company of Crows and Ravens" which he co-authored with Tony Angell, blends biology, conservation and anthropology to suggest an edgy scientific idea that human and crow cultures have co-evolved and changed one another's culture.

Marzluff speaks from 7 - 8:30 p.m., Thursday, April 24 at the Northwest Stream Center, McCollum Park, 600 128th St. SE in Everett.

Tickets are $5 for members and $7 for non-members. Advance purchase is required: call Marlene at 425-316-8592 or email aasf@streamkeeper.org.

For directions see the Web site at www.streamkeeper.org.

Killer whale tales

Instructor Jeff Hogan is the director of Killer Whale Tales, an environmental education program dedicated to promoting the understanding and active stewardship of the Puget Sound's killer whales and their habitat by students through experiential science activities and storytelling.

By using a unique approach, bringing the field directly to the classroom, the program fosters informed decision-making as students explore their relationship and responsibility to the world and the whales around them.

From 10 a.m. to noon, Saturday, April 26 at the Northwest Stream Center, McCollum Park, 600 128th St. SE in Everett. Tickets are $5 for members and $7 for non-members. Advance purchase necessary: call Marlene at 425-316-8592 or e-mail aasf@streamkeeper.org. For directions and information about the NWSCF see the Web site at www.streamkeeper.org.

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