Community

Wilson sworn in as Superior Court judge

Joe Wilson dons the judge’s robes worn by his father, John Wilson, to be sworn in as the Position 2 Snohomish County Superior Court judge Dec. 3. - Kirk Boxleitner
Joe Wilson dons the judge’s robes worn by his father, John Wilson, to be sworn in as the Position 2 Snohomish County Superior Court judge Dec. 3.
— image credit: Kirk Boxleitner

EVERETT — Joe Wilson was sworn in as the Position 2 Snohomish County Superior Court judge shortly after 4 p.m. Dec. 3, and he credited much of his success to his families.

“I come from a family of 10, and my wife comes from a family of nine,” said Wilson, who took some time to thank his siblings, his wife’s siblings, their in-laws and a number of other relations. “I’ve been blessed in the last couple of years with support from so many wonderful people who have become an extended family.”

Snohomish County Superior Court Judge Larry McKeeman swore in Wilson before he shared anecdotes of Wilson’s time as one of his law clerks. McKeeman described him as bright, thoughtful, respectful of the law and honest, and he informed the audience that Wilson was being sworn in while wearing the same judge’s robes that his father, John Wilson, had worn when he was sworn in as a Snohomish County Superior Court judge.

Retired Snohomish Court Superior Court Judge Richard Thorpe expressed his confidence that Wilson’s legal and life experiences would allow him to hit the ground running, while attorney Tom Adams recalled Wilson taking cases to the state Supreme Court twice.

“I enjoyed that he listened, and I could tell that he listened because he asked questions,” Adams said. “He understood the law, was committed to his clients and articulated his arguments well. I’ll tell the judges here to explain things to him, give him advice, criticize him, sometimes harshly, and compliment him every once in a while, but not too much,” he laughed.

Adams closed his remarks by recognizing Wilson for being the first male board member, in 1997, of the organization that would become Domestic Violence Services of Snohomish County.

Wilson expressed both pride and sorrow to the widow of Snohomish County Superior Court Judge Jim Allendoerfer for the fact that he was filling her late husband’s vacancy, and he asked those who had prayed for him during the campaign to do so even more now.

“I’ll be making decisions that will affect people’s lives for the rest of their lives,” Wilson said. “I’ll give my best work to being a Superior Court judge.”

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus

Read the Dec 13
Green Edition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Browse the archives.

loading...