Business

Walgreens opens in downtown Marysville

From left, Marysville Walgreens Pharmacy Manager Michelle Akigami, Will Ibershof, Tulalip Boys & Girls Club Unit Director Chuck Thacker, state Sen. John McCoy, Marysville Walgreens Store Manager Alan Powell, Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring, City Council member Donna Wright and Marysville Historical Society President Ken Cage take part in the Marysville Walgreens ribbon-cutting. - Kirk Boxleitner
From left, Marysville Walgreens Pharmacy Manager Michelle Akigami, Will Ibershof, Tulalip Boys & Girls Club Unit Director Chuck Thacker, state Sen. John McCoy, Marysville Walgreens Store Manager Alan Powell, Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring, City Council member Donna Wright and Marysville Historical Society President Ken Cage take part in the Marysville Walgreens ribbon-cutting.
— image credit: Kirk Boxleitner

MARYSVILLE — Walgreens opened its Marysville branch at 404 State Ave. with fanfare and charitable contributions to the community July 18.

Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring touted the store's opening as contributing to the city's plans for downtown revitalization.

"They've already improved this street corner," Nehring said. "I'm really excited by what the future will bring."

"The Mayor has already pleaded with me to add a yogurt shop, so I have my marching orders," Walgreens District Manager Bruce Philip laughed. "Our managers have put together a fabulous group of store employees, who are talented and committed and enjoy taking care of their customers."

Philip deemed his donations of $250 each, to the Marysville Historical Society and the Tulalip Boys & Girls Club, as evidence of Walgreens long-term commitment to its new community.

"We intend to maintain and even grow these contributions over time," Philip said. "Our staff lives in this community, so we care what happens here."

State Sen. John McCoy and Chuck Thacker, unit director of the Tulalip Boys & Girls Club, accepted Walgreens' oversized check to their club, which McCoy had helped institute 18 years ago.

"It was only the seventh Boys & Girls Club on a Native American reservation," Thacker said.

"Our kids are our future leaders, so we need to take care of them," McCoy said.

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

Read the latest Green Edition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Oct 18 edition online now. Browse the archives.